Internet: Circa 1969 A brave new world.

How our imaginations must have been stretched at the thought of such sci-fi communication and convenience. We simply don’t realize what a strain normal life must have been like (kidding of course). Here is an excerpt from a flight-of-fancy documentary. It’s pretty accurate! Watching this video on our new fangled computers is all very back to the future…

Advertisements

AIRMOUSE by Deanmark

The AirMouse wearable mouse

Don’t worry if you can’t or won’t buy the new iPad.  You can still have fun and save your wrists on your pc by using the ingenious but rather ungainly “airmouse”.
Technology aside, the aesthetic design could be so much more unless you like looking half-human…
Deanmark founder s Mark Bajramovic and Oren Tessler met in university, where Mark learned first-hand (no pun intended) what it’s like to OD on mousing. “Half way through our first year, I developed a computer mouse related RSI (Repetitive Stress Injury) and lost the use of my right hand and arm for several weeks,” he tells us.  According to the company website, the clinically-tested product works by aligning itself with the ligaments of your hand and wrist. This lets you keep your hand in a neutral position, and transmits more of your vector force than would be possible with a regular mouse. Not only does this make it easier on your hand, but it increases your mousing speed and accuracy as well. The mouse is also designed to remain inactive until your hand is placed in a neutral, flat position, so you can easily go back and forth between typing and mousing.
The AirMouse should be available for purchase within the next 6 to 12 months, at a price of $US129.

MINORITY REPORT SCREEN

Wall Street Journal:

About a year ago, HP began working on a ginormous touchscreen display for their PR firm’s Manhattan offices. The resulting product, called the Wall of Touch, was such a hit that it has found its way into the workplaces of other select clients, with more on the way. Ironically, despite its name, one of the things that makes the Wall unique is that users don’t have to actually touch it.

The Wall of Touch is made up of as many as nine 43 to 46-inch, 1080p panels. HP decided not to go with one big panel, as it would require rear projection and a translucent screen material that would compromise resolution. The Wall is driven by an HP Z800 workstation, essentially making it a huge HP TouchSmart computer. Built-in optical cameras and a magnetic strip detect when users are nearing it, thus the lack of needing to actually touch the screen. If users can’t reach the corners, it still works with a mouse or keyboard.

Versions of the Wall are currently in use at the headquarters of the National Basketball Association, as well as the Continental Airlines counter in the Houston airport.

So will a Touchless Touchscreen be arriving at a location near you soon? “We’re in the process of building out the next handful of walls as part of supporting our customer base, with the intent that, if there’s enough interest, HP will turn it into a mainstream product,” HP’s Personal Systems Group VP Philip McKinney told the Wall Street Journal.

It won’t come cheap, though. Prices are expected to range from $US2,000 up to $100,000 for systems with features such as HD video conferencing. The HP Wall of Touch is made up of as many as nine 43 to 46-inch, 1080p panels

ASUS unveils 3 very futuristic waveface items

ASUS' Waveface Ultra is designed to provide information anywhere, anytime
ASUS' Waveface Light can be used as a tablet or a traditional keyboard

ASUS' Waveface on display at CES 2010

ASUS – once known mostly as a motherboard manufacturer – has chosen CES 2010 to introduce some innovative laptops and futuristic concepts. Not content with showcasing a laptop designed in collaboration with Bang & Olufsen’s chief designer, it has also introduced three Waveface design concepts. The range includes a portable device worn on the wrist, a widescreen display that is both an entertainment center and internet portal and a touch-sensitive machine that can be used as a single-screen tablet or conventional keyboard – all designed by ASUS to allow the user to fully embrace the digital life…perhaps even by using one’s own physiological and emotional state as a source of data. Well, I did say “futuristic concepts”.

FOLDING FAN KEYBOARD

By Darren Quick:  Decent portable keyboards can be hard to find. Roll-up solutions like the ElekTex Smart Fabric Keyboard are extremely portable but lack the feel of traditional keys. Others that do provide traditional keys, like the Goldtouch Go! Travel keyboard, opt for a folding solution that doesn’t really reduce their size all that much. The Keystick keyboard looks to overcome both of these shortfalls with a full-sized QWERTY chicklet keyboard design that folds away like a Japanese fan to become an easily transportable stick. The Keystick folding keyboard concept